Workshops

ESFT with Couples 

Justin Corrocher, M.A., LPC, LMFT, January 20, 2017 9:00 am to 4:30 pm $150 6CE Advanced Level 

This workshop focuses on the use of the Ecosystemic Structural Family Therapy model to help couples with-stand the complex emotional, developmental and ecological pressures that influence contemporary relational life. Through lecture, discussion and video clips, a variety of techniques will be presented to guide clinicians both in assessing couples and in collaborating with them on the use of interventions that guide clinicians both in assessing couples and in collaborating with them on the use of interventions that reduce conflict and promote healthy communication.

Educational Objectives:

1) Identify two positive and two negative factors which influence the developing couple.

2) Identify two important relationship dimensions during the assessment process.

3) Describe a balanced therapeutic system.

4) Describe how to collaborate with relational partners to cultivate relational themes and goals; 5) recognize the use of enactment both as an assessment tool and as an intervention to create relational change.

ESFT with Divorcing Families

Marion Lindblad Goldberg, Ph.D., LMFT, April 21, 2017 1:15 pm to 4:30 pm $90 3CE Advanced Level

Chronically warring couples, children used as pawns, and spouses who prolong the moment of separation are components of the difficult divorce. This workshop examines the developmental tasks and clinical issues presented by divorcing families using videotape case material. Clinical assessment and intervention strategies are highlighted in the divorce process of pre-separation, separation, and post-divorce.

Educational Objectives:

1) Describe the dynamics in families navigating the divorce process;

2) Explain at least two post-divorce parenting styles and their impact on the child;

3) Identify at least two therapeutic interventions used in divorce therapy.

ESFT with Remarried or Co-habitating Families

Marion Lindblad-Goldberg, Ph.D., LMFT, May 5, 2017  1:15 pm to 4:30 pm $90 3CE Advanced Level

This workshop covers the core clinical issues of men, women and children living in remarried families. Descriptions of common pitfalls found in remarried life are presented. Videotaped case material will illustrate effective assessment and treatment interventions.

Educational Objectives:

1) Summarize issues of children, men, and women in remarriage;

2) Describe effective assessment strategies for remarried fam-ilies;

3) Describe effective treatment strategies for remarried families.

ESFT with Adult Children

Marion Lindblad-Goldberg, Ph.D., LMFT, April 21, 2017  9:00 am to 12:15 pm $90 3CE Advanced Level

This workshop demonstrates the use of an ESFT marathon model to treat families with adult children. Focus is given to the impact of sibling relationships during this stage of family development. The use of time as an intervention that compresses the therapist’s movement through the 4-stages of ESFT is highlighted through videotaped case material.

Educational Objectives:

1) Demonstrate an ESFT adult family therapy marathon;

2) Recognize how to effect change using affect;

3) List two common interven-tions used in ESFT with adult children.

ESFT Socio-Cultural Power and Privilege

Lisa Christian, M.S.W., LSW, September 12, 2017 1:15 pm to 4:30 pm $90 3CE Advanced Level

Conceptualizations of power and privilege have deepened over the last two decades. Therapists today understand power and privilege operate within more complex contexts. Not only is gender a context in which these forces are abused, but these forces also operate within the contexts of race, ethnicity, class, sexual orientation and religion. This workshop explores expressions of power and privilege within these contexts. Dialogue is essential as participants are encouraged to share their own experiences.

Educational Objectives:

1) Identify at least two major contributions to theories of power and privilege in the last two decades.

2) Discuss one new idea relative to issues of power and privilege.

3) Describe how power issues shape individual psychology as well as relational structure and dynamics.

ESFT Stage I: Constructing a Therapeutic System

Marion Lindblad-Goldberg, Ph.D., LMFT, September 13, 2017 1:15 pm to 4:30 pm $90 3CE Advanced Level

The most important element in the ESFT model is therapeutic alliance-building or “joining.” Without a strong therapeutic relationship, there is no meaningful treatment. In this workshop, focus is given to the discussion and demonstration of joining strategies with caregivers and children. These strategies are demonstrated using videotaped case clips. Several scaling devices are described for use by the clinician to assess the strength of the therapeutic alliance with caregivers and youth.

Educational Objectives:

1) describe the characteristicsof an ESFT therapeutic alliance;

2) recognize five joining strategies for strength-ening the therapeutic alliance with parents and children;

3) identify how to use therapeutic alliance scales to assess the strength of a clinician’s engagement skills.

ESFT Individual Diagnosis in Clinical Case Formulation

Pace Duckett, M.D., September 14, 2017 1:15 pm to 4:30 pm $90 3CE Advanced Level

This workshop is designed to help the family systems oriented practitioner understand the importance of individual-level assessment or diagnosis and to learn strategies for integrating this information into a comprehensive systemic case formulation. An overview of the DSM-5 will be given. The major changes from DSM-IV TR to DSM-5 are reviewed for child and adolescent diagnostic categories. In addition, attention is given to several of the more established rating scales which are used to facilitate the diagnostic process.

Educational Objectives:

1) recognize individual level data when designing family systems oriented treatment;

2) identify the major DSM-5 child and adolescent disorders;

3) strengthen skills in obtaining meaningful individual data and in making diagnoses.

ESFT Stage III: Creating Key Growth Promoting Experiences: Content and Process Interventions

Marion Lindblad Goldberg, Ph.D., LMFT,September 29, 2017 9:00 am to 12:15 pm $90 3CE Advanced Level

Ecosystemic Structural Family Therapy is an empirically-based treatment model. Within this stage of treatment there are specific interventions that produce incremental change in four important areas of family functioning; co-caregiver-alliance; attachment; executive functioning and self-regulation. This workshop describes and demonstrates structural interventions such as: boundary making, punctuating behavioral complementarity; eliciting strengths, unbalancing power alignments, and raising intensity. Special emphasis is given to the use of enactment as an intervention. Enactments are demonstrated that:1)test hypotheses about current family structure and strength of attachment and, 2) promote growth in these family interactions.

Educational Objectives:

1) Describe at least two ESFT interventions;

2) Describe the four phases of an enactment;

3) Recognize enactments that promote executive functioning or attachment.

ESFT Stage III: Strengthening Parental Executive Skills with Teenagers

Justin Corrocher, M.A., LPC, LMFT, November 10, 2017 9:00 am to 12:15 pm $90 3CE Advanced Level

Dealing with challenging adolescents is difficult for both parents and seasoned clinicians. Using a systemic perspective, this workshop addressed the quality of the relationship between parents and the adolescent as an essential component of treatment. In a relational context of isolation and alienation, symptoms tend to escalate. After guidelines are presented for assessing the severity of adolescent problem behavior, focus is given to effective teen disciplinary methods for mild, moderate, and severe teen problems.

Educational Objectives:

1) Describe the typical symptomatic cycle found in families with adolescents;

2) Recognize “connection-based” discipline vs. “control-based” discipline;

3) Demonstrate effective parenting skills with adolescents

ESFT Stage III: Working with Trauma

Justin Corrocher, M.A., LPC, LMFT, December 1, 2017  9:00 am to 12:15 pm $90 3CE Advanced Level

Clinicians are often confronted with the effects of unresolved trauma on family interaction. The traditional definition of trauma is expanded to include “relational trauma” wherein the exposure to an event engenders disruption in familial trustworthiness, security and openness. This working highlights the signs of trauma in both children and their caregivers. Clinical tasks are then identified that promote healing from trauma with emphasis on helping families create an open, reflective dialogue.

Educational Objectives:

1) Recognize key behavioral, emotional, biological and relational markers of trauma in both children and their caregivers.

2) Identify core clinical tasks involved in helping families create a safe relational environment that supports healing from trauma.

3) Describe the open and reflective family dialogue that promotes trauma healing and strengthens current family relationships.

ESFT Stage IV: Solidifying Change, Termination and Discharge Planning

Marion Lindblad Goldberg, Ph.D., LMFT, December 15, 2017 9:00 am to 12:15 pm $90 3CE Advanced Level

Therapists need to be as clinically thorough in ending treatment as they are in beginning treatment. This workshop begins with an exploration of cultural/emotional relational endings for both families and therapists. Emphasis is placed on how clinicians need to prepare for discharge from the beginning of treatment and the suggested language to be used during each of the first three stages of Ecosystemic Structural Family Therapy. Five steps of termination are then clarified: therapist review, family therapy review, ending of the therapeutic relationship, discharge planning and treatment overlap and trouble shooting.

Educational Objectives:

1) Identify stages and tasks of discharge planning;

2) Clarify the role of preparation in effective discharge;

3) Recognize the distinction between treatment change and the therapeutic relationship issues

The Art of Clinical Supervision

Ann Itzkowitz, M.A., LMFT, June 2, 2017, 9:00 am to 4:30 pm $150 6 CE Advanced Level

Clinical supervision is the backbone for training competent psychotherapists. This workshop is a comprehensive didactic/interactive look at clinical supervision. It covers the definition and scope of supervisory process, ethical/legal issues, modalities of supervision, and culture, gender and socio-economic factors that impact clinical and supervisory work. It includes following the course of development of the therapist, of the supervisor and of their relationship. It will also address the "business" of supervision, contracts, evaluations, the particulars of working out a supervisory relationship and the responsibility it entails. Participants may bring in dilemmas they have experienced as illustrative of the supervisory principles being discussed.

Educational Objectives:

1) Describe the definition and scope of the supervisory process, including the development of the supervisee/supervisor relationship.

2) Recognize the ethical/legal and the cultural, socio-economic and gender issues that impact clinical and supervisory work.

3) Clarify the business of supervision including contracts, evaluations, limits of responsibility to the patient(s), to the supervision and to the professional field.

ESFT with Single Parent Families

Marion Lindblad Goldberg, Ph.D., LMFT, May 5, 2017  9:00 am to 12:15 pm $90 3CE Advanced Level

Most clinicians do not appreciate what an adaptive single parent family looks like or how it functions. This workshop describes an empirically-derived model of adaptive single parent functioning. The phases and tasks necessary for healthy single parent family development are discussed. Clinical interventions for correcting common non-adaptive family patterns are demonstrated through videotaped case material.

Educational Objectives:

1) Summarize a model of adaptive functioning with single parent families.

2) Identify at least two assessment and intervention areas with single parent families.

3) Identify at least two interventions that will aid adaptive family functioning.

The Art of Clinical Supervision

Ann Itzkowitz, M.A., LMFT, June 2, 2017, 9:00 am to 4:30 pm $150 6 CE Advanced Level

Clinical supervision is the backbone for training competent psychotherapists. This workshop is a comprehensive didactic/interactive look at clinical supervision. It covers the definition and scope of supervisory process, ethical/legal issues, modalities of supervision, and culture, gender and socio-economic factors that impact clinical and supervisory work. It includes following the course of development of the therapist, of the supervisor and of their relationship. It will also address the "business" of supervision, contracts, evalua-tions, the particulars of working out a supervisory relationship and the responsibility it entails. Participants may bring in dilemmas they have experienced as illustrative of the supervisory principles being discussed.

Educational Objectives:

1) Describe the definition and scope of the supervisory process, including the development of the supervisee/supervisor relationship.

2) Recognize the ethical/legal and the cultural, socio-economic and gender issues that impact clinical and supervisory work.

3) Clarify the business of supervision including contracts, evaluations, limits of responsibility to the patient(s), to the supervision and to the professional field.

ESFT Conceptual Foundations, Historical Context, and Stages of the Model

Marion Lindblad-Goldberg, Ph.D., LMFT,September 12, 2017 9:00 am to 12:15 pm $90 3CE Advanced Level

An overview of the Ecosystemic Structural Family Therapy (ESFT) model is provided which gives focus to 1) conceptual foundations, 2) model stages, and 3) change foci. The ESFT model is then contrasted with other family therapy models. Brief videotaped case segments illustrate the ESFT model. Empirical research describes the clinical effectiveness of ESFT with children and adolescents having severe emotional and behavioral disturbances.

Educational Objectives:

1) Describe the theoretical foundations of the ESFT model;

2) Describe how ESFT differs from other family therapy models;

3) Describe the ESFT clinical effectiveness research.

ESFT Socio-Cultural Influences African-American Families

Joyce Dukes, M.S., M.Phil., LMFT, David Edmonds, M.S.W., September 13, 2017 9:00 am to 12:15 pm $90 3CE Advanced Level

While race is a key organizing principle in therapy, most therapists do not acquire the skills and sensitivities necessary to deal with racial subtleties. It is important that therapists discover ways to enhance their racial awareness. A “looking within” process requires therapists to explore their racial identities and beliefs and to challenge the ways in which their roles as therapists are impacted. This workshop encourages participant discussion of a) personal experiences with African-American families; b) how therapist and client cognitive and emotional conceptualization of race contributes to the overall therapeutic alliance; c) the special challenges faced by young African-American men and women; and d) how to value the strengths of the extended African-American family.

Educational Objectives:

1) Describe the variability of African-American families;

2) Identify stereotypes of African-American families;

3) Recognize participants’ own racial beliefs.

ESFT Stage II: Creating a Meaningful Focus:From Assessment to Reframing

Marion Lindblad Goldberg, Ph.D., LMFT,September 14, 2017 9:00 am to 12:15 pm $90 3CE Advanced Level

ESFT assessment methods invite family members to participate in new conversations that humanize, contextualize and identify potential directions for change in non-adaptive family patterns. The use of family assessment tools such as genograms, critical event time-lines, eco-maps, structural maps, and core negative interaction patterns (CNIP) will be demonstrated. Focus is given to how the clinician develops a relational and contextual reframe of the problem(s).

Educational Objectives:

1) describe at least two of the ESFT assessment tools;

2) recognize a relational reframe of the identified patient’s symptomatic behavior;

3) describe how to use assessment methods to strengthen the therapeutic alliance.

Ethical/Legal Issues in Family Treatment

Ann Itzkowitz, M.A., LMFT, September 15, 2017 9:00 am to 12:15 pm $90 3CE Advanced Level

This work-shop addresses ethical and legal issues in clinical work with children, adolescents and families. Specific areas for discussion come from frequently-stated practice concerns voiced by professionals in the fields of psychology, social work, marriage and family therapy, and professional counseling. These concerns include ethical decision-making, patient diagnosis and confidentiality in a family context, child abuse and mandatory reporting, and custody problems.

Educational Objectives:

1) Summarize an ethical deci-sion-making process within a family treatment context.

2) Apply ethical considerations to issues of patient diagnosis and confidentiality in family treatment.

3) Apply ethical considerations to issues of child maltreatment and mandatory reporting, and custody problems.

ESFT Stage III: Promoting Secure Caregiver-Child Attachments to Increase Emotion Regulation and Distress Tolerance

Justin Corrocher, M.A., LPC, LMFT, October 20, 2017 9:00 am to 12:15 pm $90 3CE Advanced Level

Current research strongly supports that children with secure attachments to caregivers develop effective and lasting strategies for emotion regulation and distress tolerance. Therefore, clinicians need to help parents overcome emotional and behavioral obstacles that block attachment security. This workshop helps clinicians to attune themselves to patterns of attachment and distress tolerance in families. Focus is also given to designing family session interventions that help caregivers validate the emotional experiences of children and also coach them in achieving age-appropriate emotion regulation skills. This process promotes secure attachment between parent and child.

Educational Objectives:

1) Identify relational interactions that characterize secure, anxious and avoidant patterns of attachment.

2) Identify relational patterns that characterize dismissive, validating and coaching philosophies of emotion in families.

3) Describe effective clinical interventions that promotes secure attachment and increase distress tolerance.

ESFT Stage III: Strengthening Parental Executive Skills with Children

Justin Corrocher, M.A., LPC, LMFT, November 10, 2017 1:15 pm to 4:30 pm $90 3CE Advanced Level

There are three requirements for effective parenting executive skills: 1) parents must be able to hold onto them-selves emotionally when a child reacts to discipline; 2) parents must be thoughtful (rather than emotion-al) when implementing consequences for misbehavior; 3) parents must evolve discipline structures based on the child’s developmental needs. This workshop provides therapists with an understanding of parent-ing styles and a summary of techniques for creating effective consequences for three age groups: children ages 2 to 5, ages 6 to 8, and ages 9-11. Ross Greene’s Collaborative Problem-Solving Approach is pre-sented as a way to strengthen parental executive skills.

EducationalObjectives:

1) describe four parenting styles;

2) identify two developmentally-based discipline practices;

3) describe the Collaborative Problem-Solving Approach.

ESFT Stage III: Sexual Abuse in a Family Context

Justin Corrocher, M.A., LPC, LMFT, December 1, 2017 1:15 pm to 4:30 pm $90 3CE Advanced Level

This workshop first provides a comprehensive overview of sexual abuse including: the definition, prevalence and demographics of both child victims and offenders. A model of assessment is then described covering abuse level, family context, depth of the trauma, and warning signs in children, adolescents and families. Focus is then given to how the Ecosystemic Structural Family Therapy model treats sexual abuse in the family. Interventions are specified within each of ESFT’s four stages.

Educational Objectives:

1) Identify at least two symptoms of sexual abuse.

2) Clarify how family transactions either help or hinder coping.

3) Describe at least two interventions used with both incest survivors and adolescent offenders.